Who: The Nevada State Museum, Carson City presents:

What: Frances Humphrey Lecture Series: Future of the Stewart Indian School by Sherry L. Rupert

When: 6:30 – 8:00 p.m., Thursday, November 16, 2017. Doors open at 6:00 p.m.

Where: Nevada State Museum, 600 N. Carson Street, Carson City.

Why: To learn more about the history and future of the Stewart Indian School

Description: Established in 1890, the Stewart Indian School was one of the first 25 of hundreds of Indian Boarding Schools instituted across the nation to assimilate American Indian children into mainstream culture. The school was open for 90 years and educated over 30,000 American Indian students in the multi-colored stone structures. The 110-acre campus with over 65 buildings, is the best example of an intact campus that still remains. Rupert will briefly share the school’s past, but focus on the bright future ahead

Presenter information: Sherry L. Rupert is the Executive Director of the State of Nevada Indian Commission, and the first American Indian woman to be appointed a member of Governor Brian Sandoval’s cabinet. Mrs. Rupert is a graduate of the University of Nevada, Reno with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Administration and is past President of the Native American Chapter of the University of Nevada, Reno Alumni Association. Sherry is the Chairwoman of Nevada’s Indian Territory, a marketing arm of the Nevada Commission on Tourism, and was awarded the 2007 and 2008 Excellence in Tourism Award as well as the 2011 Statewide Excellence in Tourism Award from the Nevada Commission on Tourism for her success in promoting and advancing tourism in Indian Country. She was also awarded the 2009 Human and Civil Rights Award from the Nevada State Education Association for her work in the advancement of Indian education in the state. Mrs. Rupert was elected President of the Board of Directors for the American Indian Alaska Native Tourism Association (AIANTA), January 2014, and has been named to the prestigious U.S. Department of Commerce Travel and Tourism Advisory Board.

Cost: $8 for adults; free for museum members and ages 17 and under.

Seating is limited; please reserve your seat by contacting Mary Covington at mcovington@nevadaculture.org or 775-687-4810, at ext. 245

Contact: Bob Nylen: Rnylen@nevadaculture.org or 775-687-4810, at ext. 245.

 


 

Who: The Nevada State Museum, Carson City presents:

What: Frances Humphrey Lecture Series: Lake Tahoe’s Railroads by Stephen E. Drew

When: 6:30 – 8:00 p.m., Thursday, September 28, 2017. Doors open at 6:00 p.m.

Where: Nevada State Museum, 600 N. Carson Street, Carson City.

Description: In the 1870s, the Nevada Comstock Lode created an insatiable appetite for Lake Tahoe’s virgin pine forests. The timbers would shore up underground mining and build communities approaching 40,000 inhabitants. Railroads on three shores delivered the logs lakeside, where they were towed by steam-powered tugs to sawmills, to lumber flumes, and again by rail to their final destinations. As the mines and giant lake pines subsided, railroads pushed farther north after 1898 into new timber stands in the Lake Tahoe and Truckee River basins. Other rail lines were sold, barged across the lake, and repurposed for the burgeoning new industry of tourism. For the next 40 years, railroads marketed Lake Tahoe as their unique scenic destination.

Presenter: Stephen E. Drew has been researching railroads of the Comstock and Lake Tahoe region for 45 years. He recently retired after 35 years as chief curator of the California State Railroad Museum. He is the author of Nevada’s Virginia & Truckee Railroad in Arcadias Images of Rail series. His images are drawn from obscure archives and prized family photo albums.

Cost: $8 for adults; free for museum members and ages 17 and under.

Contact: Bob Nylen: rnylen@nevadaculture.org 775-687-4810, at ext. 245.

Seating is limited, to reserve your seat, please call Mary W. Covington at ext. 224 or email mcovington@nevadaculture.org

 


 

Who: The Nevada State Museum, Carson City and the Nevada State Railroad Museum, Carson City present:

What: Shop Talk with Stephen E. Drew and Chris DeWitt; includes book signing.

When: 1 – 2:30 p.m., Thursday, September 28, 2017.

Where: Nevada State Railroad Museum, 2180 South Carson Street, Carson City.

Come to the Nevada State Railroad Museum to learn about the Glenbrook, a wood-burning steam locomotive built in 1875, that played an important role in delivering timber from the shores of Lake Tahoe for the mines of the Comstock Lode. The Glenbrook spent decades on display outside the Nevada State Museum until 1980 when the staff and volunteers at the Nevada State Railroad Museum began the process of painstakingly restoring the Glenbrook. Staff completed the restoration in 2015. Explore the Glenbrook under steam while learning about its unique history and restoration process in a relaxed setting. Hear about the history of the Glenbrook by noted railroad historian Stephen E. Drew and the restoration process from Chief Mechanical Officer, Chris DeWitt. This is your opportunity to ask questions and enjoy a casual conversation with Stephen & Chris. Not to be missed!

Contact: Adam Michalski: 775/687-6953 ext. 224 or amichalski@nevadaculture.org.

 


 

Who: The Nevada State Museum, Carson City presents:

What: Frances Humphrey Lecture Series: Owls in Nevada by Jenni Jeffers

When: 6:30 – 8:00 p.m., Thursday, August 24, 2017. Doors open at 6:00 p.m.

Where: Nevada State Museum, 600 N. Carson Street, Carson City.

Description: Jenni will show you some of the live owl species native to Nevada and explain about their life history. Owls occupy a variety of habitats, however they are seldom observed by the public because much of their activity occurs at night. Come and find out what goes bump in the night and see these beautiful birds up close. Jenni will be available to answer specific questions about owls and how you may be able to assist in their conservation.

Presenter: Jenni received a Bachelors

and Masters degree in Wildlife Biology from New Mexico State University and shortly after, started working as a wildlife biologist for New Mexico State Game and Fish. Jenni has over 25 years of field experience as a biologist working with both avian and mammalian species. Before coming to Nevada she worked as a wildlife researcher for South Dakota State University tracking large mammals such as deer and mountain lion using radio telemetry and collecting habitat data in the beautiful Black hills of South Dakota. Jenni came to Nevada in 2001 and has been the Western Region wildlife biologist for Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) for the past sixteen years. She is responsible for survey, inventory and conservation of three major groups of animals; mammals, reptiles and birds. As wildlife biologist for NDOW, Jenni is responsible for the survey and monitoring of all species of birds including owls. She works extensively with the abandoned mine program conducting surveys for the winged mammals and schedules, coordinates and locates funding for wildlife compatible gates in her area of responsibility in order to protect important colonies of bats and owl roosts from human disturbance.

Cost: $8 for adults; free for museum members and ages 17 and under.

Seating is limited, to reserve your seat, please call Mary W. Covington at ext. 224 or email mcovington@nevadaculture.org

Please be aware that for the safety of the owls and the audience, photography will not be permitted at this lecture.

Contact: George Baumgardner, PhD gbaumgardner@nevadaculture.org 775-687-4810, at ext. 236.

 


 

Nevada State Museum, 600 N Carson St, Carson City, NV 89701

Fourth Thursday of the month 6:30 – 8:00 PM

David Toll

The Gold Hill News
Thursday, May 25, 2017

Frances Humphrey Lecture Series: The Gold Hill News by David Toll. With a large number of talented and energetic people, David Toll helped bring The Gold Hill NEWS back to life after a 92-year slumber. The NEWS became the official Storey County newspaper from June 1974 until October 1978. Staff took great pride in the slogans, “None Just As Good!” and “Mark Twain Never Worked for This Newspaper!” In its brief lifespan it was the prize-winningest and most widely-read weekly in Nevada, but sadly didn’t win any prizes at the bank and, on Nevada Day 1978, the NEWS coughed up a farewell edition. From its own obituary: “. . . for the NEWS this is finally goodbye, finished, ended. So hooray for our friends, to hell with our enemies, and we’ll see you in 92 years.

Please note that all Frances Humphrey Lectures will be reservation only. Contact mcovington@nevadaculture.org, 775-687-4810 ext. 224.

The Gold Hill News by David Toll

 


 

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Lynn Downey

The Man Who Gave Blue Jeans to the World by Lynn Downey
Thursday, April 27, 2017

Includes book signing. Blue jeans are globally beloved and quintessentially American. And no name is more associated with blue jeans than Levi Strauss & Co., the creator of this classic American garment. But despite creating an American icon, Levi Strauss is a mystery. Little is known about the man, and the widely circulated “facts” about his life are steeped in mythology. Strauss’s life was the classic American success story, filled with lessons about craft and integrity, leadership and innovation. Contact: Bob Nylen at rnylen@nevadaculture.org or 775-687-4810, at ext. 245.

 


 

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Dr. Sudeep Chandra

Beneath Tahoe Waters-The Good, Bad and the Weird! by Sudeep Chandra, PhD
Thursday, March 23, 2017

From working to preserve lakes around the globe to conserving the world’s largest trout in Northern Mongolia (the taimen also known as the Siberian River Shark), to developing public-private partnerships to protect species and habitats, Dr. Sudeep Chandra, leads an active and interesting life. His talk will revisit the historical and contemporary ecological and environmental policy developments at Lake Tahoe that have led to the protection of the watershed. His brief, 200 year retrospective will end with a discussion of the new ecological changes facing the lake from a changing global environment including climate change and the introduction of species.

Sudeep Chandra, PhD is an associate professor in the Department of Biology at the University of Nevada, Reno. His lab conducts limnological studies related to the restoration or conservation of aquatic ecosystems. Chandra’s projects include recovering native species, managing nonnative species, understanding the effects of land use change (mining, urbanization, etc) on water quality, and developing natural resource management & conservation plans for the world’s largest, freshwater fishes. Sudeep loves to engage laypersons and professionals, students, policy makers, and concerned citizens in improving environmental policy based on scientific information, and he gets to fish – a lot! He received his B.S. from the University of California, Davis, 1996 and his Ph.D., University of California, Davis, 2003.

Click here to see more information on Dr. Chandra’s research interests.

BerthaNew

 


 

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Making the Martin Luther King, Jr. State Holiday by Bertha Mullins
Thursday, February 23, 2017

The Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday is a federal holiday, but wasn’t always a state holiday. As the chairperson of the Northern Nevada Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday Advisory Committee, Bertha Mullins has a unique insight into the story of the political wrangling involved to create this state holiday.

Watch the video by Bertha Mullins

 


 

Who: The Nevada State Museum, Carson City presents:

What: Frances Humphrey Lecture Series: Stephen T. Mather’s Best Idea: Creating America’s National Park Service by Historic Character Reenactor Steve Hale

When: 6:30 – 8:00 p.m., Thursday, October 26, 2016. Doors open at 6:00 p.m.

Where: Nevada State Museum, 600 N. Carson Street, Carson City.

Why: Live historic character reenactment by the borax mining millionaire who created the National Park Service.

Description: Travel back in time to 1928 to meet the Nation Park Service’s first director “himself.” You’ll more than likely hear his first person historic account of how Lake Tahoe provided the pivotal role in making ”Ranger Programs,” a century old American tradition.

Whenever you visit a National Park, you can thank millionaire Stephen Mather, founder and 1st Director of the National Park Service. He will describe the inspired vision that was sparked in the Sierra Nevada Mountains and then spread nationally during the fierce battle over building the Hetch Hetchy Dam in Yosemite National Park. Over a century later, Director Mather’s incredible story of fortuitous events that created “America’s Best Idea” will further inspire audiences to appreciate and cherish these national treasures.

Presenter information: Steve Hale has been professionally performing live reenactments of pivotal historic figures for almost a decade. He travels up and down the West coast appearing at many venues including National Parks & Monuments, State Parks, historical societies, statue dedications, conferences, Chautauqua celebrations, and fund raising events. His recent appearances as Stephen Mather have been at the Yosemite (National Park) Valley Theater this summer, Death Valley National Park and the Furnace Creek Inn. Mr. Hale’s professional background includes awards nationally for Excellence in Interpretation & Conservation Education, as Nevada’s Conservation Educator of the Year, and regionally for preserving historical legacies through performance.

Cost: $8 for adults; free for museum members and ages 17 and under.

Seating is limited; please reserve your seat by contacting Mary Covington at mcovington@nevadaculture.org or 775-687-4810, at ext. 224

Contact: Bob Nylen: Rnylen@nevadaculture.org or 775-687-4810, at ext. 245. 

 


 

Who: The Nevada State Museum, Carson City presents:

What: Frances Humphrey Lecture Series: Battle Mountain is the Place for Me. By Ken Beaton

When: 6:30 – 8:00 p.m., Thursday, July 27, 2016. Doors open at 6:00 p.m.

Where: Nevada State Museum, 600 N. Carson Street, Carson City.

Description: Make sure you have fresh batteries in your hearing aid, be early to insure a good seat and don’t leave your sense of humor at home! Be prepared to learn some of the history of Battle Mountain, when the community received lemons, it made lemonade. If you have ever said, “There’s nothing to do in Carson City.” I suggest you check into a Battle Mountain motel for three weeks one Tuesday evening. Discover the days before computers, tablets, iPhones, internet, cable, satellite dishes, DVRs, digital players, video games, NFL game day package or eBooks. We’ll conclude with a Mitch Miller song along to “Battle Mountain is the Place for Me.”

Presenter: The Lynn, Massachusetts native spent his first five Christmases in five different states, earned an AA from Boston University Junior College, a BS from Salem State University and a M. Ed. from Utah State University. He taught at Battle Mountain High School from 1972-75 and in Carson City from 1975-94. He wrote, “One Little Girl’s Love” for Country Extra, seven articles for Nevada in the West magazine, one for Nevada Magazine, September/October 2016 and numerous commentaries for the Nevada Appeal. His memoir, THE BULLDOG BRIGADE: Every Day Red and Gray is available in print or eBook at Amazon. After six semesters of conversational Italian, Ken “followed in the footsteps” of the First Special Service Force, The Devil’s Brigade, battles during WW II celebrating the 70th anniversary of Rome’s liberation, June 4, 2014.

Cost: $8 for adults; free for museum members and ages 17 and under.

Contact: Bob Nylen: rnylen@nevadaculture.org 775-687-4810, at ext. 245.

 


 

Who: The Nevada State Museum, Carson City presents:

What: Frances Humphrey Lecture Series: McAvoy Layne as Mark Twain

When: 6:30 – 8:00 p.m., Thursday, June 22, 2016. Doors open at 6:00 p.m.

Where: Nevada State Museum, 600 N. Carson Street, Carson City.

Description: McAvoy Layne as Mark Twain….Prepare for a wildly entertaining evening!

Presenter: For twenty-eight years now, in over four thousand performances from Piper’s Opera House in Virginia City to Leningrad University in Russia, McAvoy Layne has been preeminent, in preserving the wit & wisdom of “The Wild Humorist of the Pacific Slope,” Mark Twain. McAvoy is the ghost of Samuel Clemens in the Biography Channel’s episode of Mark Twain, and in the Discovery Channel’s Cronkite Award winning documentary, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. He is a winner of the Nevada Award for Excellence in School and Library Service, and author of the soon to be published audiobook, One Life is Not Enough. Says McAvoy, “It’s like being a Monday through Friday preacher, whose sermon, though not reverently pious, is fervently American.”

Cost: $8 for adults; free for museum members and ages 17 and under.

Contact: Bob Nylen: rnylen@nevadaculture.org 775-687-4810, at ext. 245.